How to Avoid Being a ‘Korean Doctor’

Posted November 04, 2018 11:19:21The word “Korean” is one of the most common acronyms in English.

And it means something like “Korea-based doctor,” which is why the title of this article is “The 5 Ways to Avoid being a Korean Doctor.”

I’m a physician in Seoul, South Korea, and I’m a practicing family physician.

The Korean word for doctor, 파공, is the name of the nation’s most prestigious medical school.

It’s where I’m trained and where I have patients.

In my career, I’ve had some of the best medical students in the world.

When I began my medical training in 1998, I was told that doctors from other countries had to go to the U.S. to get their degree.

That’s because we were a medical colony in South Korea.

I was told by my doctors that, in order to get a good degree, you needed to be born in South Korean.

So I applied for a U.K. degree, which was granted to me by the Department of Medicine, which is a branch of the Department for the Education of the Health Profession in England.

But then I applied again for a medical degree in the U-K., which I got in 2007.

And I was shocked to find out that I was not allowed to go back to the United States to take my medical school examination.

What’s wrong with the U.-K.

system?

So, I applied to go again, and again, to the Department, but it was not granted my application.

So I applied once more, and this time I was approved.

Then I applied on my own, and that was a mistake.

After I had my degree, I did not want to be a doctor.

It was not because I was a Korean doctor.

It was because I wanted to be employed in the United Kingdom.

My husband, who is also a doctor, and a few friends and colleagues also did not like the idea of me being a doctor in the South Korean system.

They didn’t think I was qualified to do my job.

I was an academic who had studied abroad, and they thought that was the same as being a professional in the Chinese system.

So we decided to go and study in the UK.

I had never studied in the US before.

We wanted to study English and I had always wanted to become a doctor to be able to treat patients in the Western world.

The U.KK system has been a dream of mine since I was five years old.

If I could only go back, I would do it.

Now, in the new year, I have a new job, and we are preparing to go home for the holidays.

There are three doctors in our family who are Korean.

So that’s where we are in our life.

This article was written by Ken Jeong, a practicing physician, and Elizabeth Dung, a professor of family medicine at the University of Southampton.

It originally appeared in New York magazine.